Wednesday, June 14, 2017

CFP Technologies of Frankenstein Conference (2 of 2)

Announcement and Call for Papers: “Technologies of Frankenstein”, 7 - 9 March 2018, Hoboken, NJ
https://networks.h-net.org/node/73374/announcements/181237/announcement-and-call-papers-%E2%80%9Ctechnologies-frankenstein%E2%80%9D-7-9
 
Announcement published by Michael Geselowitz on Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Type: Call for Papers
Date: October 15, 2017
Location: New Jersey, United States




Announcement and Call for Papers: “Technologies of Frankenstein”

Sponsor and Host: Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ, USA

Meeting Dates: 7 – 9 March 2018

CFP Deadline: 15 October 2017

Website: http://frankenstein2018.org/



Summary:

The 200th anniversary year of the first edition of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein: Or, The Modern Prometheus has drawn worldwide interest in revisiting the novel’s themes. What were those themes and what is their value to us in the early twenty-first century?

Mary Shelley was rather vague as to how Victor, a young medical student, managed to reanimate a person cobbled together from parts of corpses. Partly as a result of this technical gap, and partly as a result of many other features of the novel, Frankenstein continues to inspire discourse in scholarly, popular, and creative culture about the Monstrous, the Outsider, the Other, and scientific ethics. This conference will examine such connections in our thinking about humanism and techno-science from the novel’s publication to the present. We construe broadly the intersecting themes of humanism, technology, and science and we welcome proposals from all fields of study for presentations that add a twenty-first century perspective to Frankenstein. Topic areas may include but are not limited to:
  • Artificial Intelligence and Robotics
  • Branding “Frankenstein” (Food, Comics, Gaming, Music, Theater, Film)
  • Computational and Naval Technology (Mapping, Navigation, The Idea of the Journey)
  • Digital Humanities and GeoHumanities (Applications, Pedagogy, Library/Information Technology)
  • Engineering Technologies: Past/Present/Future (Chemical, Electrical, Biomedical)
  • Future Technologies and Labor Concerns

Submit abstracts of 300 words and brief CV by 15 October 2017 to Michael Geselowitz (mgeselowitz@ieee.org) and Robin Hammerman (rhammerm@stevens.edu).

Contact Info:

Michael N. Geselowitz, Ph.D., Senior Director
IEEE History Center at Stevens Institute of Technology
Castle Point on Hudson
Hoboken, NJ 07030 USA
Contact Email:
m.geselowitz@ieee.org
URL:
http://frankenstein2018.org/

CFP Technologies of Frankenstein Conference (1 of 2)

Technologies of Frankenstein: 1818-2018 (7-9 March 2018, Stevens Institute of Technology)
https://networks.h-net.org/node/73374/announcements/180688/technologies-frankenstein-1818-2018-7-9-march-2018-stevens

Announcement published by Robin Hammerman on Monday, May 22, 2017

Type: Call for Papers
Date: October 15, 2017
Location: New Jersey, United States

Call for Papers

Technologies of Frankenstein: 1818-2018

7-9 March 2018, Stevens Institute of Technology (Hoboken, New Jersey USA)

Co-sponsors: Stevens Institute of Technology and IEEE History Center

The 200th anniversary year of the first edition of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein: Or, The Modern Prometheus has drawn worldwide interest in revisiting the novel’s themes. What were those themes and what is their value to us in the early twenty-first century? Mary Shelley was rather vague as to how Victor, a young medical student, managed to reanimate a person cobbled together from parts of corpses. The imagination of the novel’s readership outfitted Victor’s laboratory with the chemical and electrical technologies that brought the creature to life. Subsequent theatrical and cinematic versions of Frankenstein have been, like the creature, patched together from the novel and from contemporary popular press as well as public demonstrations of medical, chemical, and electrical research. Mary Shelley’s contemporaries arguably exploited her novel to their own purposes, including George Canning (leader of the British House of Commons in 1824) who drew an analogy between the prospect of freeing West Indian slaves and Victor’s “monster” who is left in the world with no master to curtail his criminal instincts. Some of Mary Shelley’s biographers characterize the story of Victor Frankenstein’s reanimation experiment as a cautionary tale against techno-science run amok while others emphasize Victor’s irresponsible behavior toward his subject. In what ways might our tools of science and communication serve as an “elixir of life” since the age of Frankenstein? Topic areas include and are not limited to items on the list below. For more information about the conference and to register please visit http://frankenstein2018.org.


  • Branding “Frankenstein” (Food, Comics, Gaming, Music, Theater, Film)
  • Computational and Naval Technology (Mapping, Navigation, The Idea of the Journey)
  • Digital Humanities and GeoHumanities (Applications, Pedagogy, Library/Information Technology)
  • Engineering Technologies: Past/Present/Future (Chemical, Electrical, Biomedical)
  • Future Technologies and Labor Concerns
  • How might industrialized nations develop low-cost solutions to provide maternal and pediatric care in regions with limited medical facilities?
  • How are our ideas of the “Monstrous” or “Other” changing since the publication of Frankenstein?
  • Is the pharmaceutical industry using human consumers as experiments for profit?
  • What ethical and legal issues will emerge in the age of advanced or “aware” artificial intelligence?
  • What does it mean to be human?
  • What is the responsibility of government in world-wide health care?
  • Who is responsible for the outcomes of techno-science?
  • Who should have access to advanced human enhancement technologies and why?

Submit inquires and/or abstracts of 300 words with brief cv by 15 October 2017 to Michael Geselowitz (m.geselowitz@ieee.org) and Robin Hammerman (rhammerm@stevens.edu).

We are dedicated to a harassment-free conference experience for everyone.


Contact Info:

Michael Geselowitz (IEEE History Center) and Robin Hammerman (Stevens Institute of Technology, College of Arts and Letters)
Contact Email:
rhammerm@stevens.edu
URL:
http://frankenstein2018.org

Advance Notice ICFA 2018

I was excited to come across this recently:

200 Years of the Fantastic: Celebrating Frankenstein and Mary Shelley
The 39th International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts

March 14-18, 2018
Orlando Airport Marriott Lakeside, Orlando, Florida

Guests of Honor: John Kessel and Nike Sulway
Guest Scholar: Fred Botting
Special Guest Emeritus: Brian Aldiss

CFP Science Fiction Studies on Frankenstein at 200

Been meaning to post this for a while:

deadline for submissions: 
August 1, 2017
full name / name of organization: 
Nicole Lobdell and Michael Griffin
contact email: 
Science Fiction Studies is currently soliciting proposals for a July 2018 special issue celebrating the bicentennial of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818), a work that forever changed the genre of science fiction. In Frankenstein, Shelley experimented not only with subject matter, new scientific inventions and their many terrifying and horrific possibilities, but also narrative and form. Her use of multiple frame narratives, nested one within another, was a notable shift from the eighteenth-century novels she grew up reading, and her merging of popular culture’s fascination with science and the Gothic broadened the emerging genre of science fiction. Her refusal to provide a clear didactic lesson left readers to judge for themselves the actions of Victor Frankenstein, and the ending left the Creature’s fate unclear, the possibility of its survival forever impacting future readers and writers. Adaptations and appropriations of Shelley’s narrative and form have become staples of science fiction, and as such, Frankenstein holds a celebrated spot as a creative source that inspires subsequent science fiction.

Shelley’s novel did not always enjoy the critical acclaim and canonical status that it now holds. Nonetheless, Frankenstein continues to resonate and influence the definitions, forms, narratives, and media of contemporary science fiction and contemporary authorship. In what ways does Frankenstein’s influence transform how authors and readers understand the limits of science fiction? How do the genre-bending and metafictional components of Frankenstein influence definitions of science fiction? What does Frankenstein have to say about the current political climate and global issues such as citizenship, immigration, and war? These questions have inspired this call for papers, and the editors envision this special issue as a celebration of Mary Shelley, the legacy of Frankenstein, and the light it continues to cast on science fiction since its publication. Essays that explore the intersections of recent science fiction novels and critical approaches are particularly encouraged, as are essays that consider cross-media adaptations of Frankenstein or Frankenstein-inspired narratives. Other potential topics could include:

Adaptations (art, comics, theatre, videogames, etc.,)
Aesthetics
Animal Studies
Culture of 1818 & 2018 (citizenship, immigration, war)
Digital Humanities
Digital Media
Disability Studies
Feminisms
GeoHumanities
Globalization
Gothic
Immigration
Intertextuality
Medical Humanities
Neuroscience
Philosophy
Poetry
Popular Culture
Romanticism
Science and Technology (AI, robotics, etc.,)
Visual Culture

Please send proposals (300-500 words) by 1 Aug. 2017 to Michael Griffin (michael.griffin@lmc.gatech.edu) and Nicole Lobdell (nicolelobdell@depauw.edu). Completed papers (6000-8000 words) will be due by 1 Oct. 2017.

Last updated March 9, 2017

Saturday, February 25, 2017

ALA Session Update 2/25

It is with sadness that I must report that our proposed session on "Frankenstein and the American Dream?" (details at https://frankensteinandthefantastic.blogspot.com/2017/02/ala-panel-details.html) has been rejected by the organizing committee of the American Literature Association.

Michael Torregrossa
Area Chair

Thursday, February 9, 2017

CFP Romanticism and Popular Culture (5/15/2017; SAMLA)

Of potential interest:

Romanticism and Popular Culture

Event: 11/03/2017 - 11/05/2017
Abstract: 05/15/2017
https://www.cfplist.com/CFP.aspx?CID=10778

Location: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Organization: Keats-Shelley Association of America and the South Atlantic Modern Language Association


Romanticism and Popular Culture, an affiliated session of the Keats-Shelley Association of America at the South Atlantic Modern Language Association 89th Annual Conference in Atlanta, Georgia, USA (3-5 Nov. 2017)

In keeping with this year’s conference theme (“High Art/Low Art: Borders and Boundaries in Popular Culture”), this panel seeks papers that address topics related to popular culture and British Romantic-era literature, although other Romanticism-related topics certainly will be considered. Sponsored by the Keats-Shelley Association of America, this affiliated session especially welcomes papers related to second-generation Romantic-era British writers and/or their literary circles, namely those addressing the lives and/or works of John Keats, Percy and Mary Shelley, Lord Byron, Leigh Hunt, and William Hazlitt.

See <http://k-saa.org> for more information about the Keats-Shelley Association of America.

Please send a 250-word abstract, bio or CV (no more than ONE page), and any audio-visual requests to Ben P. Robertson, Troy University (bprobertson@troy.edu), by 15 May 2017.



Contact Email: bprobertson@troy.edu
Website: https://samla.memberclicks.net/

Thursday, February 2, 2017

ALA Panel Details

I am pleased to report that Frankenstein and the Fantastic has submitted the following panel to the organizers of the American Literature Association. Notification of acceptance is in March.



Frankenstein and the American Dream?

Sponsored by Frankenstein and the Fantastic, an outreach effort of the Fantastic (Fantasy, Horror, and Science Fiction) Area of the Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association

Organizer and Chair: Michael A. Torregrossa, Independent Scholar

1.     Bride of Frankenstein as Parody of the Christ Narrative,” Martin F. Norden, University of Massachusetts Amherst

2.     “Frankenstein and Fulfilling the American Dream: Why We Root for the Underdog,” Cheryl A. Hunter, University of Massachusetts Lowell/Southern New Hampshire University

3.     “Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Love: ‘Happily Ever After’ in Adaptations of Frankenstein,” Maggie Damken, Independent Scholar

4.     “ ‘And What Was I?’ The Power of Aesthetic Perception in Shelley’s Frankenstein,” Jobin Davis, University of Central Missouri

Audio-visual equipment required: dvd player, projector, and screen.

Frankenstein and the Fantastic, an outreach effort of the Fantastic (Fantasy, Horror, and Science Fiction) Area of the Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association, seeks in this panel to highlight some of the various ways that Americans have shaped and/or appropriated the Frankenstein story. We begin with Martin Norden’s examination of The Bride of Frankenstein, the sequel to Universal Studio’s Frankenstein; both films have had an enormous impact of Americans’ conception of Frankenstein and our reaction to its creature. Next, we have two related papers, by Cheryl A. Hunter and Maggie Damken, respectively, each of whom highlight some of the ways that American creators have produced new narratives that further rewrite Shelley’s story to allow the creature access to some of the privileges accorded to all Americans. Finally, Jobin Davis explores ways in which the Frankenstein story has a more direct influence on the lives of Americans through the experiences of transgender individuals.


Thursday, January 5, 2017

CFP Frankenstein and the American Dream

Frankenstein and the American Dream?
Frankenstein and the Fantastic, an outreach effort of the Fantastic (Fantasy, Horror, and Science Fiction) Area of the Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association seeks proposals for a panel in commemoration of the endurance of Frankenstein and the Frankenstein tradition. The session is being submitted for the 2017 meeting of the American Literature Association to be held in Boston, Massachusetts, from 25-28 May 2017.
Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein celebrates the two-hundredth anniversary of its publication in 2018, and, over the almost two centuries of the story’s existence, Frankenstein, its characters, and its themes have inspired a myriad range of creative responses, including retellings, adaptions, linked texts (i.e. prequels, midquels and sequels), recastings, and allusions. American creators seem to have been especially fascinated by Frankenstein and its textual progeny, and American-made productions have offered many thought-provoking transformations of Shelley’s work.
What is most interesting is that some of these American works promote happy (or at least happier) endings to the tale that permit the creator and/or his creation to live beyond the ending prescribed by Shelley’s narrative. This has allowed them, the creature most importantly, to achieve (at least to some extent) the privileges, available to all Americans, of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. In seeking and claiming aspects of the American dream for Shelley’s characters the Frankensteiniana of the United States provides insight in how one nation in particular has adopted and appropriated Shelley’s story and made it its own.
We are especially interested in proposals that explore how American-made texts relate to Shelley’s novel and the larger tradition of Frankenstein-related texts in popular culture. Possible options would include works by American production companies (film and television studios, publishing houses, comic book companies, etc.), American-born creators working either in the United States or abroad, and foreign-born creators working for American companies. Additional options might explore Frankenstein and Frankenstein-related texts in an American context/setting.
Please submit proposals to FrankensteinandtheFantastic@gmail.com no later than 28 January 2017. A complete proposal should include the following: your complete contact information, a clear and useful title of your paper, an abstract of your paper (approximately 250 to 600 words), a brief biographical statement explaining your academic status and authority to speak about your proposed topic, and a note on any audio/visual requirements.
Further details on the Fantastic (Fantasy, Horror, and Science Fiction) Area can be found at https://nepcafantastic.blogspot.com. The Frankenstein and the Fantastic project has its own dedicated site at https://frankensteinandthefantastic.blogspot.com/ that will be expanded in 2017.
Complete details on the American Literature Association and its conference can be found at http://americanliteratureassociation.org/ala-conferences/ala-annual-conference/.